Cruel conditions at live animal markets

photo: Woody Swartz

Two South Florida grocery stores that sell live animals have run into trouble with state inspectors.

Following an ARFF complaint about extremely crowded tanks full of frogs, and the sale of live turtles, at Foodtown, a market in Davie, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) issued the market warnings for “improper temporary caging, and improperly exhibiting softshell turtles.”

Earlier this month, NBC 6 South Florida reported that the FWC inspected a different market, New York Mart in Sunrise, and found animals kept in cruel conditions (two dead turtles were discovered among those offered for sale). The market was issued criminal citations for “temporary caging not allowing movement,” and “maintaining wildlife in an unsafe condition.”

ARFF will continue to visit these markets to make sure that state regulations that provide limited protections to frogs and turtles are enforced.

Biohazard training for Hendry County health workers

biohazard-blog

With three monkey breeding facilities in operation in Hendry County, and a fourth under construction, it is probably a good thing that staff members from the county health department and Hendry County EMS recently attended a training session to help them identify and respond to biological threats (photo from The Caloosa Belle).

Monkeys imported into the U.S. for laboratory research can carry dangerous viruses and bacteria, such as Herpes B and tuberculosis. The threat is greater with wild-caught monkeys, such as the 630 crab-eating macaques imported in 2014 by Primate Products (the company was the subject of a recent investigation by PETA).

Of course, the best way for Hendry County to protect against an outbreak of infectious disease would be to put a stop to the expansion of the monkey breeding industry. Visit ARFF’s website to learn more.

Dissection restricted in Miami-Dade public schools

logoOn June 17, the School Board of Miami-Dade County voted unanimously to stop cat dissections in county schools. The school board will also explore the possibility of ending all animal dissections throughout the district. It was a significant step for America’s 4th largest public school system! ARFF thanks board member Raquel Regalado for proposing the action.

Dissecting the bodies of dead cats has been banned in Broward County for many years. Today, there are many humane alternatives to classroom dissection– including models, computer software and other state-of-the-art educational materials.

Does a public school near you use cats in dissections? Contact the school board and urge them to follow the example set by Miami-Dade and Broward counties. Contact ARFF for help.

Activists rally statewide to stop bear hunt

For Immediate Release: June 19, 2015

(Lakeland, FL) — At its June meeting, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) will take a final vote on opening a bear hunting season in Florida. Animal activists across the state will rally against a bear hunt at the FWC’s regional offices in West Palm Beach, Ocala, Lake City, Lakeland and Panama City.

PROTEST DATE AND TIME: Monday, June 22 at 12:00 noon

LOCATIONS:

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
South Regional Office
8535 Northlake Boulevard
West Palm Beach, FL 33412

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
North Central Regional Office
3377 E U.S. Highway 90
Lake City, FL 32055

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
Southwest Regional Office
3900 Drane Field Road
Lakeland, FL 33811

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
Northwest Regional Office
3911 Hwy. 2321
Panama City, FL 32409

“Commissioners are ignoring the majority of Floridians who have said they oppose a bear hunt,” said ARFF Campaigns Coordinator Nick Atwood. “A trophy hunt is not a solution to human-bear conflicts. To protect public safety, Florida’s state wildlife agency should invest in bear-resistant trash cans, and not waste its limited resources on a hunt.”

Bears were last hunted in Florida in 1993. Although bear numbers have grown, hunting will threaten a still-recovering population (the Florida black bear was only removed from the state threatened list in 2012).

Hunting bears deep in the woods will not reduce bear conflicts in residential neighborhoods. Properly securing garbage and eliminating other attractants (pet food, outdoor grills, bird feeders) is the key to reducing conflicts with bears.

*The FWC meeting will be held June 23-25 in Sarasota.

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Elephants trade sunny Florida for snowy Rochester, New York

For Immediate Release: April 22, 2015

(Jacksonville, FL) — Last week, two African elephants were transferred from the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens to the Seneca Park Zoo in Rochester, New York.

The two female elephants, Moki and Chana, joined two elephants already at the zoo in Rochester.

Sadly, this is only the most recent move for the two elephants. Moki and Chana arrived in Jacksonville from the Lee Richardson Zoo in Garden City, Kansas in October 2006. In return, the Jacksonville Zoo moved a different pair of elephants (“Missy” and “Kimba”) to Kansas. The swap was an (unsuccessful) experiment designed to encourage Moki and Chana to breed with a male elephant at the Jacksonville Zoo.

“Too often, zoos trade elephants like baseball cards, without the best interest of the individual elephant in mind,” said ARFF Campaigns Coordinator Nick Atwood. “The two Florida elephants have a future of harsh winters to look forward to. In Rochester, Moki and Chana will likely spend more time confined indoors, especially during the winter months.”

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